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Se muestran los artículos pertenecientes a Noviembre de 2016.

Writing Task # 3

Friday, 4th November 2016

Create a story (100 words) about a witch, a cat and a haunted house.

Your story should begin with: This is the witches first Halloween...            

 

                                           

04/11/2016 12:58 miprimerzarzablog #. ENGLISH Hay 1 comentario.

Conditional Tenses

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Conditional tenses describe the result of something that might happen (in the present or future) or might have happened but didn’t (in the past).

                 

1st Conditional Tenses

IF + SUBJECT + PRESENT SIMPLE, SUBJECT + WILL + INFINITIVE

SUBJECT + WILL + INFINITIVE + IF + SUBJECT + PRESENT SIMPLE

We use the First Conditional to talk about future events that are likely to happen.

  • If we take John, he’ll be really pleased.
  • If you give me some money, I’ll pay you back tomorrow.
  • If they tell us they want it, we’ll have to give it to them.
  • If Mary comes, she’ll want to drive.  
The ’if’ clause can be used with different present forms.
  • If I go to New York again, I’ll buy you a souvenir from the Empire State Building.
  • If he’s feeling better, he’ll come.
  • If she hasn’t heard the bad news yet, I’ll tell her.

The "future clause" can contain ’going to’ or the future perfect as well as ’will’.

  • If I see him, I’m going to tell him exactly how angry I am.
  • If we don’t get the contract, we’ll have wasted a lot of time and money.

The "future clause" can also contain other modal verbs such as ’can’ and ’must’.

  • If you go to New York, you must have the cheesecake in Lindy’s.
  • If he comes, you can get a lift home with him.

exercise 1

exercise 2

exercise 3

exercise 4

exercise 5

 

2nd Conditional

IF + SUBJECT + PAST SIMPLE, SUBJECT + WOULD+ INFINITIVE

SUBJECT + WOULD + INFINITIVE + IF + SUBJECT + PAST SIMPLE

The Second Conditional is used to talk about ’impossible’ situations.

  • If we were in London today, we would be able to go to the concert in Hyde Park.
  • If I had millions dollars, I’d give a lot to charity.
  • If there were no hungry people in this world, it would be a much better place.
  • If everyone had clean water to drink, there would be a lot less disease.

After I / he/ she /it we often use the subjunctive form ’were’ and not ’was’. (Some people think that ’were’ is the only ’correct’ form but other people think ’was’ is equally ’correct’ .)

  • If she were happy in her job, she wouldn’t be looking for another one.
  • If I lived in Japan, I’d have sushi every day.
  • If they were to enter our market, we’d have big problems.

The form ’If I were you’ is often used to give advice.

  • If I were you, I’d look for a new place to live.
  • If I were you, I’d go back to school and get more qualifications.

The Second Conditional is also used to talk about ’unlikely’ situations.

  • If I went to China, I’d visit the Great Wall.
  • If I was the President, I’d reduce taxes.
  • If you were in my position, you’d understand.

The choice between the first and the second conditional is often a question of the speaker’s attitude rather than of facts. Compare these examples. Otto thinks these things are possible, Peter doesn’t.

  • Otto – If I win the lottery, I’ll buy a big house. (1st conditional)
  • Peter – If I won the lottery, I’d buy a big house. (2nd conditional)
  • Otto – If I get promoted, I’ll throw a big party. (1st conditional)
  • Peter – If I got promoted, I’d throw a big party. (2nd conditional)
  • Otto – If my team win the Cup, I’ll buy champagne for everybody. (1st conditional)
  • Peter – If my team won the Cup, I’d buy champagne for everybody. (2nd conditional)

The ’If clause’ can contain the past simple or the past continuous.

  • If I was still working in Brighton, I would commute by train.
  • If she were coming, she would be here by now.
  • If they were thinking of selling, I would want to buy.

The main clause can contain ’would’ ’could’ or ’might.

  • If I had the chance to do it again, I would do it differently.
  • If we met up for lunch, we could go to that new restaurant.
  • If I spoke to him directly, I might be able to persuade him.

Sometimes the ’if clause’ is implied rather than spoken.

  • What would I do without you? ("if you weren’t here")
  • Where would I get one at this time of night? ("if I wanted one")
  • He wouldn’t agree. ("if I asked him")

exercise 1

exercise 2

exercise 3

exercise 4

exercise 5

exercise 6


26/11/2016 11:35 miprimerzarzablog #. ENGLISH Hay 1 comentario.

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